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Simply put 35 psi in the tires and you'll hit 30 plus on the highway and mid 20's in the city. Cool part is less friction on the tire the faster the car goes! My dealer did this at my request. Nitrogen of course........
 

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Simply put 35 psi in the tires and you'll hit 30 plus on the highway and mid 20's in the city. Cool part is less friction on the tire the faster the car goes! My dealer did this at my request. Nitrogen of course........
Does this improvement reflect in the average fuel consumption numbers in the trip computer ?
 

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It def helps when you calculate your mileage out yourself at least. I noticed diminishing mileage, a softer ride, and felt that I was slowing down faster than usual. I checked tires and found they were all down a bit, filled them to about recommended (little over) and everything was better including mileage.
 

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35 cold can be a little too high, depending on outside temp variations. If you fill them in the morning at 72 degrees to 35, then start hitting the highway in the heat of the day say 90-95 air temp (not counting how much hotter the pavement is) that will surely boost you up to about 42psi or more. These tires are rated I think max 44 cold, but I still wouldn't run them over 40 Hot, or you could risk a bad day. Also, these cars are a little squirrelly at highway speeds, not easy to keep them in a lane as it is; with fat tires it makes it MUCH harder to control that straight line.


I keep them at 32 cold when airing up in the low 70's. As the summer starts really creeping in, I'll check them hot once in awhile just to stay on top of the above issue. I believe balancing performance slightly over MPG, the minor difference isn't going to save that much money...but too full could actually cause you to lose control much easier then a lower PSI grip will.
 

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N is less susceptible to fluctuations due to temps so doesn't inflate/deflate much with time of year/day/how hard you drive/ etc...
 

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When it's all said and done, the only thing better about a nitrogen filled tire is that the systems used to air the tires have little to no water, so you're not putting in humid air. Essentially a compressor with a Dryer system will give you those same results, just a mixed blend of conventional air, which is still 78% Nitrogen by volume.


Nitrogen still seeps from the tire, albeit not as much as natural air; but tests prove it is a nominal difference. If you are checking the tires every month as you should regardless, you won't skip a beat. As far as tire rot, that's caused more by the moisture in the tires then the type of air.


Running cooler with nitrogen...come on...now that's just marketing BS.


In the long run, nitrogen filled tires are best for people that don't take care of their tires, chicks and old people. But I won't pay extra for air in the tires ever. Want to give me nitrogen for free, sure, I'm yer huckleberry...but since my compressor at home has a dryer on it, WTH do I really need nitrogen only for?
 

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I set all my tires to 40 psi and while the ride is a little more bumpy, it seems to roll better. However, the fuel consumption is locked at 13.5/litres per 100 Kms and so I'm not seeing a material improvement there. I didn't expect to see a lot of improvement as I do mostly city driving.

What's the biggest cause of changes in vehicle fuel consumption ?

Spark plugs ? No
Air filter ? No
Tires ? No
Fuel type ? No

The answer is.....your brakes !
 
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